Local church leaders hold prayer, call for change

 

SNOW HILL, Md. – A moment of solidarity in Snow Hill as a number of church leaders came together for a prayer and vigil service to end racial injustice. “The bible says faith without work is dead. So we must pray but we must also take action also. We’re going to stand on the word of God and believe what God can do,” said Pastor Markel Thomas of Ebenezer United Methodist Church.

Church leaders tell us 47ABC it’s through the power of prayer that people can find the strength to make a change. “We all have a voice to lift up and we need to let the world know about the injustices that have been going on in the world, and we need to speak out,” said Rev. Joshua Berry of Bates Memorial United Methodist Church.

Girdletree Charge’s Rev. Frances Fitchett says that no matter how big or small the community, it’s important to come together and show support for each other. “The small towns are often forgotten. They’re often left out. They’re often felt that their voice isn’t being heard in this little town. We have to make them aware that happens in one place happens in another place,” said Rev. Fitchett.

Through prayer and song, local church leaders called for change and justice when it comes to racial inequality. “The bible says faith without work is dead. So we must pray but we must also take action also. We’re going to stand on the word of God and believe what God can do,” said Pastor Thomas.

Rev. Mary Haggard of Whatcoat United Methodist Church says that showing up in solidarity is an essential part of standing in solidarity with those facing injustice and making a change. “Black Lives Matter is not just a black thing. We all have to show support and be there and let people know that we’re all there for them,” said Rev. Haggard.

Pastor Thomas says that part of making that change involves setting an example. “We came together because it’s needed in the community, and we as leaders should come together in this difficult time. We should put our own agendas aside and meet on one accord,” said Pastor Thomas.

Church leaders tell 47ABC that part of being a Christian involves helping those that are in need. “It kind of ties into our call as Christians to seek out and to help those that are hurting – to be the hands and feet of Christ – and to lift everyone up,” said Rev. Berry.

Rev. Fitchett added that without taking a stand, there is no change. “We’re here to show that we need to take a stand, and we are no longer going to be silent anymore,” said Rev. Fitchett.

After the prayer service, electronic candles were given out and a moment of silence was held for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. That’s the amount of time Derek Chauvin knelt on George Floyd’s neck before he died. The church leaders who helped to organized the Snow Hill prayer and vigil say they’re planning to do more like this one in the future.

Categories: Local News, Maryland