5 things kids should tell their asthma doctor

[image] © iStockphoto.com / Lisa Eastman

WEDNESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Children, not their parents, should do most of the talking about their asthma symptoms when seeing an allergist, according to a new study.

Researchers looked at about 80 children with asthma and their parents. Although parents can provide useful information, it's important for allergists to ask both parents and children about symptoms, activity limitations and use of medications to better understand and treat the child's asthma, the researchers found.

The importance of listening to children with asthma is highlighted by the fact that they report having a better quality of life in terms of activity limitations than their parents believe, according to the study, which was published in the July issue of the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

"Our research shows that physicians should ask parents and children about the effects asthma is having on the child's daily life," said study lead author Margaret Burks, of the pediatrics department of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

"Parents can often think symptoms are better or worse than what the child is really experiencing, especially if they are not with their children all day," Burks said in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Asthma is a serious condition that leads to more than 10.5 million missed school days a year, Dr. James Sublett, chairman of the college's public relations committee, said in the news release. "It is important for children to tell their allergist about their symptoms so the best treatment can be provided and over-treating doesn't occur," he said.

The asthma experts list these five topics that children with asthma and their parents should discuss with their allergist:

More information

The American Lung Association has more about children and asthma.

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


© Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WMDT