Maryland

Live explosives shake the town of Hurlock

Live explosives shake Hurlock

HURLOCK, Md. - This quiet rural road near Hurlock was anything but this week after a startling discovery on Bobtown Road.

Residents telling 47 ABC, "I was amazed and scared all at the same time." Others saying ,"It's very unusual." 

According to witnesses, a pair of metal military boxes were found along a path off Bobtown Road, but what was found inside shocked the residents in Hurlock.

"I tried to open one and I couldn’t get it open and then I set that one down and I opened the other one and it came right open, and these grenades fell out and I was just shocked. I was scared to death and I backed the hell away from there," says Ernest Carter, the man who discovered the explosives. 

Carter immediately called 911. He later learned he'd stumbled upon 38 grenades.

"They looked like they were the old ones, like World War II ones, the pineapple grenades." 

Nine of them, the State Fire Marshal's Office later determined were live. It's something that even they say is pretty uncommon.

"We get a couple every year but to have so many in one spot is kind of unusual," says Deputy Chief State Fire Marshal Joseph Flanagan. 

Residents of Bobtown Road had no idea anything was even wrong Monday until their loved ones couldn't get home. 

"My husband left for work around two and he usually comes for his dinner break at eight. It’s 8:15 p.m. and I’m like 'he’s not here ye,t where is my husband?' and he finally called and said 'I can’t get home' I said why he said 'the roads blocked'" explains Tawonnia Burford-Travers.

The road was finally cleared around midnight, but before that even more surprises. 

"We heard a little noise and the house shook a little bit." 

"It was about 11:30 p.m. that night and we heard these booms about three big booms, so I guess that’s where they were getting rid of them," explains Carter. 

Authorities tell us they exploded six grenades at the nearby landfill. A few were diffused at the scene, others deemed safe to transport.

But there's still many questions that have been left unanswered. 

"We want to find out now, 'how did they get there, why are they there, and who's they are?" explains Flanagan. 


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