Delaware

Del. patient advocate groups express concerns over health care bill

Del. patient advocate groups express...

GEORGETOWN, Del. - In Delaware, the conversation on health care continues.

This week lawmakers return to Capitol Hill after a week long 4th of July recess, but before heading back Senator Tom Carper is making some local stops.

On Monday, representatives from various health groups in Delaware voiced their concerns about the proposed health care bill.

"The Medicaid portion of it does not provide any insurance and help that the people need," says Don Keister, a Board Member at AtTacK addiction.

Senator Carper met with groups like AtTacK addiction and NAMI Delaware to discuss the GOP health care bill.

"I've asked my colleagues to hit the pause button, and lets stop throwing rick rats at each other, and see if maybe we work together figure out what in the Affordable Care Act we can preserve , what should be fixed, and what should be dropped," says Senator Carper.

Under the senate bill, the proposed cuts would slash Delaware's Medicaid funding by 2 billion dollars over the next ten years, something that is weighing heavy on mental health advocates.

"We know that 1 in 5 adults at some point will experience a mental health condition and we also know that have of them will seek treatment. And with this new bill we are concerned because the treatment they might not have access to," says Annie Slease, the Director of Advocacy and Education at NAMI Director.

Also troubled by the bill, are groups that are tackling the opioid epidemic.
 
"This is one of the biggest problems we have in the United States today, and we need to treat it that way," says Keister.

During the round table discussion residents called on both Democrats and Republicans to work together to draft a comprehensive healthcare plan.

Republican leaders are weighing on a new amendment from Senator Ted Cruz. Cruz's proposal has received backing from the the Trump administration.

Lawmakers have three weeks to work on the health care bill before congress goes into recess in August.


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